Thursday, March 5

Purim Class: 7:30 PM - From Basics to the Depth.

 

Sunday, March 8

Community Hamantashen Bake: 1:00 PM - Make, fill, roll, pinch, and bake you own hamantashen. 

 

Monday, March 9

Megillah Reading at Chabad: 7:30 PM followed by buffet dinner, no cost.

 

Tuesday, March 10

Morning Minyan and Megillah Reading at Chabad: 8:30 AM 

Purim Under the Sea Celebration: 5:00 PM - Megillah Reading: 6:00 PM. Dinner, Fun Performance by the Bubble Lady, Music.  

farbrengen.jpg

  Farbrengen:  8:30 PM - Join us as we end Purim with a warm, joyful farbrengen. A Farbrengen is like a "Spiritual Oasis". A time that we pause from the regular, and reflect within ourselves and with others about our spiritual growth. This is done with powerful stories, Torah, Lchaim and melody.  

The first Chabad Rebbe shared that " a farbrengen can accomplish more than what the archangel Michael can do on our behalf! " 

(Read an interesting article about Farbrengen by 
Clicking here>>> )


 
Purim begins Monday night, March 9 and continues through Tuesday, March 10, 2020
 
The jolly festival of Purim is celebrated every year on the 14th of the Hebrew month of Adar (late winter/early spring). It commemorates the salvation of the Jewish people in ancient Persia from Haman’s evil plot. 
 
It is commemorated with fulfilling 4 Mitzvot:
  • Reading of the Megillah (book of Esther), which recounts the story of the Purim miracle. This is done once on the eve of Purim and then again on the following day.
  • Giving money gifts to at least two poor people.
  • Sending gifts of two kinds of food to at least one person.
  • A festive Purim feast, which often includes wine or other intoxicating beverages.
 

Purim Customs 
There is a spirit of revelry and fun on Purim that is unparalleled on the Jewish calendar. If there were ever a day to “let loose” and just be Jewish, this is it! Read why here.
 
It is also customary for children (and adults, if they desire) to dress up in costumes. Read why here.

A traditional Purim food is hamantaschen (or oznay Haman), three-cornered pastries bursting with poppy seeds or another sweet filling. Read why here.